Updating drivers for

"Icons" views have a direct link to Device Manager, as does "Classic View" on Windows Vista only.Windows XP and earlier: Click , click on the Hardware tab, then on the "Device Manager" button on the Device Manager panel.Any drivers they offer will usually be generic drivers not matched to your particular motherboard. Note that basic plug 'n' play USB sound devices without a choice of inputs (like a USB microphone or a USB turntable or cassette deck) generally use the operating system's USB Audio Class drivers.If such a device is malfunctioning and the manufacturer does not offer special drivers, examine the USB cable and connections, or look in the device's or the operating system's control panels for issues with the device or with the Universal Serial Bus controllers. Windows users can try updating their drivers via Device Manager in the first instance, before looking for drivers on the internet.Once you have the necessary information about your sound device, you can normally obtain appropriate updated drivers specific to your hardware from the internet.Manufacturers of motherboard sound devices such as Realtek, Sigmatel and Soundmax do not usually provide any driver support to end users.

You can search Google or Yahoo to find the correct internet address of the manufacturer.These must be replaced with drivers made by the manufacturer of your hardware, so they are correctly matched to that hardware.If you have now got updated non-Microsoft drivers, try them and see if your recording problem is cured.If you have a branded computer, go to the computer manufacturer's website.If you have a PCI or external soundcard or interface, go to the website of the soundcard manufacturer.

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